News

In the stately Longworth House Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.—where Congressional Representatives and their staff work and convene—over 50 people gathered to attend a briefing held by the International Exchange and Study Caucus. The event focused on the importance of international exchange and study programs, particularly those sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Intercultural and Educational Affairs (ECA).

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By Christopher T. Barber, YES Program Participant Recruiter

An accent from the American south is quite peculiar: the elongation of vowels and shortening of consonants, all said in a nonchalant, yet formal eccentricity, is reminiscent of the United States’ British ancestors.

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At the Eastern-Europe FLEX-Ability Workshop in Kvareli, Georgia, 62 alumni of the Future Leaders of Exchange program known as FLEX gathered at the Ministry of Justice Training Center. Alumni representing the past nine years of the FLEX program travelled to the workshop from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine with a shared goal: take a community need and transform it into a social enterprise using entrepreneurial skills, technology, and STEAM techniques. (STEAM is science, technology, engineering, and math, plus arts.)

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By Kuttubek Rakhmanberdiev, U.S.-Central Asian Education Foundation (US-CAEF) alumnus

In this rapidly changing world and this age of increasingly globalized technologies, education has become available practically to anyone who wants to study. Now youth from developing countries, including Kyrgyzstan, can study at leading world universities and work at big international companies. However, many young people in remote provincial regions of our country still do not have enough information about these opportunities.

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By Elvira Dana, Regional Director for American Councils Southeast Europe

As an American living in Belgrade, Serbia for the past two years, my daily life is a paradox of passing anti-American graffiti and placards mourning those killed in the 1999 NATO bombings as I walk to the homes of Serbian friends who welcome me warmly. To friends in Serbia, I am an American, but not America. To those who don’t know me, I am merely a representative of the United States—an American conflated with America—for better or worse.

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